Releasing Stress and Learning to Let Go

July 8, 2015   •  Posted in: 

Typically, any pressure to perform we feel in our daily lives generates from an external source, or so it would seem. At home and at work, you are constantly being held responsible for meeting the expectations of others—physically and emotionally. However, the majority of the time, these are expectations for which you have made yourself responsible. In most cases, these are probably activities you want to be responsible for, but no doubt there are times and circumstances under which you say yes, when you would prefer to say no. Actually, “preference” suggests you could go either way. In fact, saying no is often critical to maintenance of your overall wellbeing—emotionally, environmentally, relationally, physically, and spiritually.

The next time you are feeling overwhelmed by the pressure to perform, control, or “fix” something—for yourself or for someone else—weigh the possibility of simply letting go:

  • To “let go” does not mean to stop caring; it means I can’t do it for someone else.
  • To “let go” is not to cut myself off; it’s the realization that I can’t control another person.
  • To “let go” is not to enable poor behavior or choices, but to allow learning from natural consequences.
  • To “let go” is to admit powerlessness, which means the outcome is not in my hands.
  • To “let go” is not to care for but to care about.
  • To “let go” is not to fix but to be supportive.
  • To “let go” is not to judge but to allow another to be a human being.
  • To “let go” is not to be in the middle arranging all of the outcomes but to allow others to affect their own destinies.
  • To “let go” is not to be protective; it’s to permit another to face reality.
  • To “let go” is not to deny but to accept.
  • To “let go” is not to nag, scold, or argue but instead to search out my own shortcomings and correct them.
  • To “let go” is not to adjust everything to my desires but to take each day as it comes and cherish myself in it.
  • To “let go” is not to regret the past but to grow and live for the future.
  • To “let go” is to fear less and to love more.

At The Center • A Place of HOPE, this list has proven effective for motivating positive change in ourselves and in our clients.

If you or a loved one is suffering from stress, hopelessness or depression, know that there is help. For more information about depression treatment, fill out this form or call 1-888-747-5592 to speak confidentially with a specialist today. The Center • A Place of HOPE Depression Treatment Facility was recently ranked as the #1 treatment facility in the country for depression, and our team is standing by to help you and your loved ones.

Dr. Gregory Jantz

Pioneering Whole Person Care over thirty years ago, Dr. Gregory Jantz is an innovator in the treatment of mental health. He is a best-selling author of over 45 books, and a go-to media authority on behavioral health afflictions, appearing on CBS, ABC, NBC, Fox, and CNN. Dr. Jantz leads a team of world-class, licensed, and...

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