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    Dr. Weil’s Data Smog Diet

    How do you know if you’re crossed over the line from use of technology, to obsession, from controller to being controlled? Perhaps the true answer to whether or not you have control over the technology in your life is to do a tech detox.
    Andrew Weil, MD, has instituted a simple set of personal rules that help him defeat information overload adn unhealthy stress:
    “Deleting, without remorse, all games from my computer and mobile devices.”
    “Refusing to aimlessly surf the Web. I always have a specific object in mind and resolve to seek only that.”
    “Handling email almost exclusively on my desktop computer, almost never on my cell phone or notepad. When I leave my office for the day, usually in the afternoon, I leave the computer and email behind until morning.”
    Weil reports that he is much happier having made these changes. “My mind is clearer, my attention span longer and my real (as opposed to virtual) friendships closer.”
    As much as it may pain you to consider a similar tech-lifestyle change, it could be time for just that – a voluntary reduction in your use of technology. You can try something similar to Dr. Weil’s, or construct your own parameters. What’s most important is recognizing the need for change or, if you’re not so sure, simply giving it a try to see just how #Hooked you really are!
    A portion of the above is excerpted from chapter 11 in #Hooked: The Pitfalls of Media, Technology and Social Networking by Dr. Gregory Jantz.

    How do you know if you’ve crossed over the line from use of technology, to obsession, from controller to being controlled? Perhaps the true answer to whether or not you have control over the technology in your life is to do a tech detox.

    Andrew Weil, MD, has instituted a simple set of personal rules that help him defeat information overload and unhealthy stress:

    “Deleting, without remorse, all games from my computer and mobile devices.”

    “Refusing to aimlessly surf the Web. I always have a specific object in mind and resolve to seek only that.”

    “Handling email almost exclusively on my desktop computer, almost never on my cell phone or notepad. When I leave my office for the day, usually in the afternoon, I leave the computer and email behind until morning.”

    Weil reports that he is much happier having made these changes. “My mind is clearer, my attention span longer and my real (as opposed to virtual) friendships closer.”

    As much as it may pain you to consider a similar tech-lifestyle change, it could be time for just that – a voluntary reduction in your use of technology. You can try something similar to Dr. Weil’s, or construct your own parameters. What’s most important is recognizing the need for change or, if you’re not so sure, simply giving it a try to see just how #Hooked you really are!

    A portion of the above is excerpted from chapter 11 in #Hooked: The Pitfalls of Media, Technology and Social Networking by Dr. Gregory Jantz.

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